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Photography of Al Camp, Stu Levy, Ken Smith, Pat Morrissey,
Paul Roark, Lynn Radeka

Handy Film Reciprocity Charts


Tri-X, Bruce Barnbaum times
TMax 100, Bruce Barnbaum times
TMax 100, Photo Techniques times
TMax 100, Don Kirby times

 
Tri-X Pan film
(Bruce Barnbaum suggested times**)
Metered
Exposure
Required
Exposure

Contrast
Increase*
2 seconds
3 seconds
N+1/2
5 seconds
8 seconds
N+1/2
10 seconds
18 seconds
N+1/2
15 seconds
30 seconds
N+1
20 seconds
45 seconds
N+1
30 seconds
75 seconds
N+1
1 minute
3 minutes
N+1 1/2
2 minutes
7 minutes
N+1 1/2
4 minutes
16 minutes
N+1 1/2
10 minutes
50 minutes
N+2
20 minutes
2 hrs, 20 min.
N+2
30 minutes
4 hours
N+2
*Contrast Increase:
     *Shown is approximate contrast increase due to reciprocity failure and extended exposure. For example, if contrast increase is N+1 for an exposure, then with normal film development the negative will increase in contrast as if you had a N+1 development. Give the negative a N-1 development to compensate for the contrast increase due to the long exposure. However, sometimes you may want to increase contrast of a low contrast scene and give a negative normal development instead of a compensation development.

      **Source: Barnbaum, Bruce. The Art of Photography: An Approach to Personal Expression. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co., Iowa. 1994. pp77. ISBN 0-8403-9647-3

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T-Max 100 film
(Bruce Barnbaum suggested times**)
Metered
Exposure
Required
Exposure

Contrast
Increase*
2 seconds
2.5 seconds
N+1/2
5 seconds
7 seconds
N+1/2
10 seconds
15 seconds
N+1/2
15 seconds
24 seconds
N+1/2
20 seconds
33 seconds
N+1/2
30 seconds
50 seconds
N+1/2
1 minute
2 minutes
N+1
2 minutes
4.5 minutes
N+1
4 minutes
10 minutes
N+1
10 minutes
28 minutes
N+1 1/2
20 minutes
65 minutes
N+1 1/2
30 minutes
1 hr. 50 min.
N+1 1/2
     *Shown is approximate contrast increase due to reciprocity failure and extended exposure. For example, if contrast increase is N+1 for an exposure, then with normal film development the negative will increase in contrast as if you had a N+1 development. Give the negative a N-1 development to compensate for the contrast increase due to the long exposure. However, sometimes you may want to increase contrast of a low contrast scene and give a negative normal development instead of a compensation development.

      **Source: Barnbaum, Bruce. The Art of Photography: An Approach to Personal Expression. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co., Iowa. 1994. pp77. ISBN 0-8403-9647-3

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T-Max 100 film
(Photo Technique Magazine suggested times**)
Metered
Exposure
Required
Exposure

Contrast
Increase*
2 seconds
2.5 seconds
N
4 seconds
6 seconds
N
5 seconds
7 seconds
N
8 seconds
11 seconds
N
10 seconds
15 seconds
N
15 seconds
27 seconds
N
30 seconds
65 seconds
N
1 minute
2 minutes
unknown
2 minutes
4.5 minutes
unknown
4 minutes
10 minutes
unknown
10 minutes
28 minutes
unknown
20 minutes
65 minutes
unknown
30 minutes
1 hr. 50 min.
unknown
     **Source: Photo Technique Magazine. For meter indications of 1 to 30 seconds, expose for the times shown above the meter indication. Contrast gain with T-Max films in this range is small enough to be ignored.
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T-Max 100 film
(Don Kirby suggested times**)
Metered
Exposure
Required
Exposure

Contrast
Increase*
2 seconds
2.5 seconds
N+1/2
4 seconds
6 seconds
N+1/2
8 seconds
11 seconds
N+1/2
15 seconds
25 seconds
N+1
30 seconds
54 seconds
N+1
1 minute
1 min. 55 secs.
N+1
2 minutes
4 minutes
N+1 1/2
4 minutes
8.5 minutes
N+1 1/2
8 minutes
17.5 minutes
N+1 1/2
15 minutes
36 minutes
N+2
30 minutes
1 hr. 30 min.
N+2
1 hour
3 hr. 30 min.
N+2
     *Shown is approximate contrast increase due to reciprocity failure and extended exposure. For example, if contrast increase is N+1 for an exposure, then with normal film development the negative will increase in contrast as if you had a N+1 development. Give the negative a N-1 development to compensate for the contrast increase due to the long exposure. However, sometimes you may want to increase contrast of a low contrast scene and give a negative normal development instead of a compensation development.

      **Source: Don Kirby workshop

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